top of page

Chrissy Angliker  Inner Blooms

Marco D'Anna  Oltrereale

Robertson Käppeli  Resize

Stalla Madulain, 23.07. - 25.09.2022

Text

Stalla Madulain - Robertson Käppeli
Stalla Madulain - Robertson Käppeli
Stalla Madulain - Robertson Käppeli
Stalla Madulain - Marco D'Anna
Stalla Madulain - Marco D'Anna
Stalla Madulain - Marco D'Anna
Stalla Madulain - Marco D'Anna
Stalla Madulain - Chrissy Angliker
Stalla Madulain - Chrissy Angliker
Stalla Madulain - Chrissy Angliker
Stalla Madulain - Chrissy Angliker
Stalla Madulain - Chrissy Angliker
Stalla Madulain - Chrissy Angliker
Stalla Madulain - Chrissy Angliker
Stalla Madulain - Chrissy Angliker
Mirko Baselgia - Text

   Chrissy Angliker  Inner Blooms

  

   Artist Statement

Inner Blooms: On Conscious and Parallel Work

The ground floor grotto of Stalla Madulain evokes in me Carl Jung’s writing on one of his dreams in ‘Man and His Symbols’, where he travels to the bowels of his house and comes upon an ancient cavern. He interprets this as the dream alerting his consciousness to an inner space in himself he had not yet had access to, or explored.

Allowing the grotto to take on the persona of Jung’s dream cavern, it creates the perfect vessel to bring awareness to the concept of parallel work. Work which manifests itself as artworks shaped simultaneously yet subconsciously alongside the conscious work, the paintings.

Paintings

We know this saying: “Sag es durch die Blume.” The expression is used to convey the need to deliver difficult news softly, tenderly, with elegance and great care.

During the days of deep isolation that descended upon New York in 2020, I found myself painting in the past tense. And while you do not need me to explain to you the contours of experiencing these times, something beautiful occurred just as it seemed so many hardened structures might as well just collapse and fall away: they didn’t. Just like a still life.

It’s a trippy time and these paintings speak to me of space. I’m creating environments and temperatures I want to reside in; an outward reflection of our space and time turned inward and made tolerable. These paintings are healthy, to paint and to consume. Painted with love, desperation, confusion and liberation. 

 

In late 2021, I started to paint flowers when I began to feel my emotional limbs again. 

 

The flower became not just the foundation of this work, but the vessel to move it outward, my catalyst to surrender, release, and embrace a multitude of methods and techniques to help me speak again.

 

These are cut flowers that still bloom, through everything, brave and uninterrupted, sentinels for my hesitations and guides through my doubts. 

 

If there is any lesson to glean from the ongoing tumult, perhaps it’s a new understanding of the absence of formula, the recognition that the universe will do what it wants with unimaginable strength; and while we are powerless to bend it, we can if we choose to honor its iridescence.

Parallel work

 

Where my painting process is the discernible current, the parallel work is the undercurrent. The inextricable symbiosis of art and parallel work is sacred and essential. A painting is the crumb on the trail, whereas the process is the loaf, the source of the crumble. There are conscious and unconscious crumbles, both their own artwork.

For me, the boundaries of the canvas represent the limits of conscious thought. I deliberately eschew the checks and balances that attend conscious control of the strokes of the brush or the flick of the spoon. I regard the marks that spill beyond the boundaries of the canvas—the most wild and exaggerated extensions of my medium—as an expression of the unconscious mind.  This parallel work not only shapes the environment around the artwork, but also ultimately seeps in and shapes consciousness.

I first became aware to the parallel work in 2011, and have fostered a painting practice to let it freely take shape over the last decade. Parallel works behave differently in time and space. Sometimes they take form in the physical, and others are best captured, now as NFT’s.

The physical work, “Tarp 2022,” is an amalgamation of the unconscious work created parallel and adjacent to each canvas since January 2021. So are the pillows and shoes, also parallel work, hardened and shaped to sculpture by the process.

For the first time I’m exploring the framework of NFT’s as another outlet of art making. I perceive it as a way to illuminate my philosophy, discovery and creation on parallel works. And to expand on what is art, and what is of value beyond the boundaries of the canvas. 

These NFT’s are titled in reference to the paintings that last shaped them. That way the bond between the NFT and its raison d'etre, the physical and conscious artwork is forever honored.

Marco D'Anna  Oltrereale

IL MITO DELLA MONTAGNA

Pittori, fotografi, incisori, scrittori, sono stati i pionieri.

La pittura dei paesaggi alpini d’alta quota ha diffuso al pubblico una nuova visione del mondo alpestre

pieno di romanticismi e simbolismo cercando di trasmettere la forza evocativa delle Alpi. William England, Caspar Wolf, Ferdinand Hodler, Harnold Böcklin, Alexandre Calame e soprattutto Giovanni Segantini con la sua mistica, hanno contribuito in maniera determinante, attraverso la loro poetica, a creare il mito della Montagna nel quale tutti noi oggi crediamo. Prima del mito la montagna era vissuta come un luogo ostile, duro da vivere, pieno di magia, pericoli e mistero.

OLTREREALE, La realtà immaginata.

Frammenti di memoria infinitamente mutabili sviluppo del mio lavoro:

Prendendo l'esempio di un paesaggio di montagna, io so che per scattare l'immagine mi sono avvicinato al luogo e ho visto la catena montuosa da altri punti e con luce diversa. Non solo, ne ho viste altre, lì vicino o anche più lontane, che mi sono rimaste nella mente e che a loro volta hanno evocato altre immagini, non necessariamente fotografiche. Magari quadri, di artisti di epoche diverse, realizzati con tecniche diverse.

“La realtà non ci fu data e non c’è, ma dobbiamo farcela noi” come la memoria che continua mutabile giorno dopo giorno a trasformare i ricordi, frammenti in continua trasformazione.

La mia fotografia come la memoria è composta di frammenti in continuo mutamento. Ho cercato di fermare un ricordo composto da molti ricordi dello stesso luogo apparentemente sempre uguali ma in fondo sempre diversi. Le fotografie delle montagne sono anche la ricerca impossibile di fermare il tempo di creare una memoria indissolubile. Così, per evadere dalla nuova solitudine creata dalla pandemia del Coronavirus nel 2020, ho raggiunto l'Engadina durante le quattro stagioni. Nella testa avevo il celebre trittico di Giovanni Segantini, il grande ambasciatore del mito della montagna engadinese. Ispirandomi alla potenza della sua pittura fatta di luci e di ombre, ho creato le immagini fotografiche con la tecnica digitale, sovrapposto strutture di carta d’acquarello Fabriano e ho dato vita a immagini contemporanee che richiamano la tecnica divisionista in una nuova, composita e inedita visione dei luoghi iconici dell’alta Engadina. I paesaggi sono reali, ma nel contempo immaginari. Sono innesti. Il luogo è l’Engadina, ma le vette sono immaginazione. Una immaginazione molto realistica, che mi consente appunto di creare una "realtà immaginata". Pura costruzione, mito! La fotografia si stacca così dalla riproduzione del reale, ci interroga, rimette in discussione quello che diamo per acquisito accentuando il limite tra oggettivo e soggettivo e così entra nel mondo dell’immaginario fantastico della creazione, della memoria e della visione, abbracciando con gratitudine l'arte che ci ha consentito di “vedere” il passato prima della tecnica fotografica: la pittura.

    

 

   

  

bottom of page